Techniques

Deep Tissue Massage

Deep Tissue massage is designed to relieve severe tension in the muscle and the connective tissue or fascia. This type of massage focuses on the muscles located below the surface of the top muscles. Deep tissue massage is often recommended for individuals who experience consistent pain, are involved in heavy physical activity, such as athletes, and patients who have sustained physical injury. It is also not uncommon for receivers of Deep Tissue Massage to become sore or even bruised over the next few days, this generally feels like you’ve had a good workout and will subside over a few days, leaving the muscles feeling looser and less painful.

Neuromuscular therapy (NMT)

Is a form of massage. It is distinguished from other types of massage in that a quasi-static pressure is applied to the skin with the aim of stimulating specific areas of skeletal muscle. Often these areas of muscle are myofascial trigger points.

The application of NMT is dependent on several key factors:

  • The location of myofascial trigger points
  • Force has to be applied to the skin surface with the correct pressure and timing if muscle is to be stimulated

Strain-Counterstrain 

Is a type of “positional release” created in the early 1960s by Lawrence Jones, D.O. It is a hands-on treatment that alleviates muscle and connective tissue tightness by the use of very specific treatment. During the procedure, the involved tissue is “slackened” causing a relaxation of the “spasm” which, in turn, allows local areas of inflammation, trapped within the painful tissue to dissipate. Following this “release” there is an immediate reduction of pain and tension in the involved tissue. This relaxation helps restore normal joint mobility and is also beneficial to other structures in the region that may have been compressed.

Myofascial Release

The fascial system is totally one structure that is present from your head to foot without any interruption. It is a seamless web of connective tissue that covers and connects the muscles, organs, and skeletal structures, located between the skin and the underlying structure of muscle and bone.

The fascia is manipulated, directly or indirectly, to allow the connective tissue fibers to reorganise themselves in a more flexible, functional fashion.

Injuries, stress, inflammation, trauma, and poor posture can cause restriction to fascia. Since fascia is an interconnected web, the restriction or tightness to fascia at a place, with time can spread to other places in the body like a pull in a sweater.The goal of myofascial release is to release fascia restriction and restore its tissue health.

Joint Mobilisation

Is a type of passive movement of a skeletal joint. It is usually aimed at a ‘target’ synovial joint with the aim of achieving a therapeutic effect. When applied to the spine, it is known as spinal mobilisation

Spinal mobilisation is a type of passive movement of a spinal segment or region. It is a gentle, often oscillatory, passive movement applied to a spinal region or segment so as gently to increase the passive range of motion of that segment or region.

Muscle Energy Technique

Is used in osteopathic medicine and physical therapy to treat somatic dysfunction presenting as loss of range of motion secondary to muscular inhibition.

Muscle Energy is an Active (requires patient utilization of force) Direct (engages the barrier) technique that promotes muscle relaxation by activating the golgi tendon reflex.

Purpose is to gain motion that is limited by restrictions of neuromuscular structures.

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